How to Have a Good Divorce with Sarah Armstrong

EP: 141

Sarah Armstrong

How to Have a Good Divorce


When our children are growing up, we cover the electrical outlets. We make sure they wear bike helmets and drink organic milk. We go out of our way to ensure that they are safe and healthy and happy. And yet, many parents fail to protect their kids from the toxicity of a high-conflict divorce. So, what can we do to set aside our feelings for our ex and make things better for our children?

Sarah Armstrong is the author of The Mom’s Guide to a Good Divorce: What to Think Through When Children Are Involved. Sarah began her career with Leo Burnett before joining the Coca-Cola Worldwide Media team in 1997. In 2017, she transitioned to a leading global management consulting firm where she serves as Partner. After her own marriage ended, Sarah became the go-to advisor for her divorcing friends and was inspired to write The Mom’s Guide… to share that wisdom with the world.

On this episode of Divorce Dialogues, Sarah joins Katherine to discuss the responsibility we have to take co-parenting seriously and bring our kids up in the healthiest environment possible. She introduces us to the key components of a good divorce, offering insight on how to approach decision-making with your ex and compartmentalize your feelings to focus on what’s best for your children. Listen in for Sarah’s advice on how to course correct and end up with a good divorce—even if it didn’t start off that way.

Topics Covered

The experiences that inspired Sarah to write The Mom’s Guide to a Good Divorce

Sarah’s argument against the societal perception that you cannot have a good divorce

The potential to have a good divorce even if it’s one-sided

The responsibility we have to take co-parenting seriously and bring our kids up in the healthiest environment possible

The key components of a good divorce

Sarah’s advice on approaching your ex with one shift that will make things better for your children

How to minimize your child’s feeling that they are a professional traveler

The top two mistakes divorced couples make that adversely impact their children

Engaging your kids for help in creating new holiday traditions

Strengthening your compartmentalization muscle and taking care of yourself in this time of unexpected togetherness

How to course correct and end up with a good divorce (even if it didn’t start off that way)

Connect with Sarah Armstrong

Mom’s Guide to Good Divorce

Connect with Katherine Miller

The Center for Understanding Conflict

Miller Law Group

Katherine on LinkedIn

The New Yorker’s Guide to Collaborative Divorce by Katherine Miller

Email katherine@westchesterfamilylaw.com

Call (914) 738-7765

Resources

The Mom’s Guide to a Good Divorce: What to Think Through When Children Are Involved by Sarah Armstrong